Corporations eye Hidden Valley’s single-family homes.

This brick sign marks an entrance to Charlotte’s Hidden Valley neighborhood. Built in the late 1950s, the neighborhood sits between Sugar Creek Road, Tom Hunter Road and North Tryon Street, about 5 miles northeast of uptown.

This brick sign marks an entrance to Charlotte’s Hidden Valley neighborhood. Built in the late 1950s, the neighborhood sits between Sugar Creek Road, Tom Hunter Road and North Tryon Street, about 5 miles northeast of uptown.

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Sandra Springs can’t escape offers from corporations to buy her home.

In 1989, when she and her husband bought their five-bedroom house in Hidden Valley — a predominantly Black community in northeast Charlotte — it cost them $65,000. After moving there, the couple developed lasting friendships with neighbors and grew to love the community where they raised their family.

Today Springs watches homes nearby her house sell for upwards of $400,000. While it’s not always clear who is buying them, offers at her own doorstep have yet to slow down. .

“I get post cards, letters, and I of course tell them no,” Springs, 68, said. “Then they ask me, do

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Mayor Adams Unveils Recommendations to Convert Underused Offices into Homes

January 9, 2023

Office Adaptive Reuse Task Force Builds on Adams Administration’s Efforts to Revitalize Central Business Districts and Expand Housing Supply With 11 Concrete Recommendations 

With Recommendations in Place Alongside Current Rules, Office Conversions Could Create Homes for as Many as 40,000 New Yorkers Over Next Decade

NEW YORK – New York City Mayor Eric Adams today unveiled recommendations from a city-led task force to facilitate the conversion of underused office space into new housing for New Yorkers. Crafted by the Office Adaptive Reuse Task Force, and led by New York City Department of City Planning (DCP) Director Dan Garodnick, the New York City Office Adaptive Reuse Study presents 11 concrete recommendations that would make changes to state laws and city zoning requirements in an effort to extend the most flexible conversion regulations to an additional 136 million square feet of office space — roughly the amount of office

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5 Ways to Make Homes More Affordable for Everyone in 2023

  • It’s the hardest that it has ever been for the average person to pay for housing costs.
  • Real estate businesses, lenders, and local governments can help alleviate these costs, though. 
  • Insider asked top real estate experts to share their ideas on how to do so in 2023. Here’s what they said.

With the new year is another chance to make housing more affordable for all. 

Right now, it’s harder than ever to buy a home. In 2022, an astronomical rise in mortgage rates coupled with already steep home prices pushed many out of the market altogether. Meanwhile, countless renters saw their monthly payments soar to the point of becoming rent-burdened — a situation where one is putting more than 30% of their household income towards housing

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Canada bans most foreigners from buying homes for 2 years

(Getty; Illustration by The Real Deal)

It’s not exactly as overt as a border wall, but a new law in Canada is designed to make it much more difficult for foreigners to purchase property there.

The law, which went into effect tomorrow, places a two-year ban on the purchase of residential property by non-Canadians, the New York Times reported. Regulations recently released by the government say the prohibition applies only to certain cities and not to vacation homes in recreation areas. There are exemptions for buyers with Canadian spouses or partners as well as foreign buyers of multifamily buildings with more than three units, the Times reported.

Offenders could be fined $10,000 Canadian and/or forced to sell the property, but not at a profit.

Canada, like many countries including the U.S., is experiencing a housing shortage due to low interest rates and a surge in demand during the pandemic. Other

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