U.S. targets Google’s online ad business monopoly in latest Big Tech lawsuit

WASHINGTON, Jan 24 (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department accused Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google on Tuesday of abusing its dominance in digital advertising, threatening to dismantle a key business at the heart of one of Silicon Valley’s most successful internet companies.

The government said Google should be forced to sell its ad manager suite, tackling a business that generated about 12 percent of Google’s revenues in 2021, but also plays a vital role in the search engine and cloud company’s overall sales.

“Google has used anticompetitive, exclusionary, and unlawful means to eliminate or severely diminish any threat to its dominance over digital advertising technologies,” the antitrust complaint said.

Google, whose advertising business is responsible for about 80% of its revenue, said the government was “doubling down on a flawed argument that would slow innovation, raise advertising fees, and make it harder for thousands of small businesses and publishers to grow.”

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Costco Facing Lawsuit Over ‘Fishy’ Advertising Practices

People love shopping at Costco  (COST) – Get Free Report. The membership-based warehouse club has dominated the American Customer Satisfaction Index’s annual retail survey.

The retail giant has topped the survey for six straight years scoring an 81 on a scale that goes to 100, leading its top rival Target (TGT) – Get Free Report and Walmart’s  (WMT) – Get Free Report Sam’s Club, which both scored a 78 while Walmart landed at the bottom of the survey with a 71.

Keeping customers happy is essentially Costco’s business. The company sells memberships and member retention and growth are its two most important metrics.  

In recent years, the warehouse club has done well with both. Its U.S. and Canada renewal rates have inched up to over 90% and its membership growth has been steady. Members renewing and providing the chain positive word of mouth

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Martha’s Vineyard migrant flight lawsuit could cost Florida $1 million

TALLAHASSEE — Florida has agreed to pay up to $1 million to two law firms to defend it following Gov. Ron DeSantis’ controversial decision last summer to relocate nearly 50 Venezuelan migrants from Texas to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. 

So far, the state has paid nearly $112,000 to the firms Consovoy McCarthy and Campbell Conroy & O’Neil to represent DeSantis and other state officials in a class action lawsuit filed in Boston by attorneys representing the migrants. 

This is on top of the nearly $1.6 million paid to Destin, Fla.-based aviation firm Vertol Systems Company, which the state contracted for the migrant flights.

Post-flights overview:Revisiting DeSantis, Martha’s Vineyard, and the migrant flight controversy

Administration’s role on flights:Text messages reveal DeSantis officials worked closely for weeks on Venezuelan migrant flights

When combined, it represents a cost of around $35,000 for each migrant relocated through the program.

The legal contracts were

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