Bill would make street-fighting weapons legal in NH

LEGISLATION JUST AFTERNOON, SO ALL TIME WEAPONS COULD BE GETTING A NEW CHANCE OF BECOMING LEGAL IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. AS STATE REPRESENTATIVES CONSIDER A BILL TO LIFT THE BAN ON BRASS KNUCKLES, BLACKJACKS AND SLUNG SHOTS, THERE’S NO REASON TO HAVE A PROHIBITION ON THESE ITEMS ANYMORE. WE ALLOWED NINE ACTS OF ANY LENGTH TO BE LEGAL IN NEW HAMPSHIRE OVER 12 YEARS AGO. WE HAVE PEOPLE ABLE TO CARRY FIREARMS FOR SELF-DEFENSE. AND THE TRUTH IS THAT BLACKJACKS SLUNG SHOTS AND BRASS KNUCKLES ARE PURELY NON-LETHAL. DEFENSE WEAPONS. SUPPORTERS OF THE BILL, LIKE FRANK STAPLES, WHO LED A PROTEST IN 2021 THAT SHUT DOWN AN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETING, SAY LEGALIZING THESE STREET FIGHTING WEAPONS IS ABOUT SELF-DEFENSE. I LIVE IN A HORRIBLE NEIGHBORHOOD IN MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE, AND AS I SHOWED YOU EARLIER, I HAVE A KNIFE, A KNIFE IS ACTUALLY MORE DEADLY THAN A GUN. IF I WAS … Read More

‘Tell me if I’ll be wrong to pursue legal actions’

American track and field star Sha’Carri Richardson is now considering pursuing legal action against American Airlines. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images)

American track star Sha’Carri Richardson was recently removed from an American Airlines flight after an exchange with a flight attendant. If the situation sounds familiar, it’s because free-agent wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. was also removed from an American Airlines flight after an exchange with a flight attendant recently.

Richardson posted two videos from the incident to Instagram on Saturday, claiming that a flight attendant she identified as “John” threatened her and a fan who asked for her photo.

“Tell me if I’ll be wrong to pursue legal actions against the airline,” she wrote.

From Sha'Carri Richardson (carririchardson_) on Instagram.

From Sha’Carri Richardson (carririchardson_) on Instagram.

Richardson wrote on her Instagram story that she ended a phone call at the flight attendant’s request. She added that she told him she “didn’t like the tone he

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How 3 decades of Deri’s legal troubles now see Israeli judicial independence at risk

Israeli politics were thrown into turmoil on Wednesday when Israel’s High Court of Justice ruled that Interior Minister Aryeh Deri, the leader of Shas, could not remain in his post after he’d become embroiled in a corruption scandal.

But the Wednesday in question wasn’t this past one. As fans of Israeli legal history will know, it was a Wednesday 29 years ago, on September 8, 1993.

The two rulings, this week’s and the one issued in 1993, bookend a three-decade clash over the powers of the High Court and its place in the Israeli system of government, a clash that Deri’s allies hope to bring to a clear conclusion in their favor.

The two trials are linked by the same individual, the same government post, the same overarching ethical issue. But they are also different in ways that help clarify why so many legal scholars, including outspoken critics of the

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US Schools Start Legal Actions against Social Media Companies

Social media companies are facing legal action seeking to hold them accountable for the mental health crisis among youth.

The lawsuits came recently from the public schools in Seattle, Washington and a suburban school system. But the new lawsuits face a complex legal path.

The lawsuits argue the social media platforms push harmful content. The U.S. Supreme Court is to hear arguments next month over how much federal law protects the tech industry from such claims. But even if the school systems are able to move forward with their lawsuits, it will be difficult to prove the industry is at fault.

Carl Szabo is a lawyer with the tech industry trade association NetChoice. He said the companies should not be blamed because they may have shown teens content that caused emotional harm. He compared the legal action to suing a bookstore “because an employee recommended a book that caused emotional

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It is still legal to hit children in school in 19 American states

According to this year’s student handbook, wearing “sagging pants” or being too touchy with a crush in the hallway is enough to get a teenager paddled by the school principal in Union County, Mississippi. A first-time dress code infraction, public display of affection, repeated tardiness or failure to hand in homework three times in nine weeks makes children eligible for corporal punishment. Beatings in the state’s schools are not uncommon. In 2018, the year for which the latest numbers are available, 69,000 American children were hit by public-school staff—30% of them in Mississippi. Though intentionally wounding a pet cat is punishable by six months in prison, teachers in Mississippi can legally strike kindergarteners with wooden paddles for speaking out of turn.

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Legal trends for the games industry to watch in 2023 | Opinion

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One year ago, we made some predictions on legal trends for 2022. Now it is time to look back and see where we have been right and where we have been wrong – and make some new predictions for 2023.


So, what we have predicted for 2022 was the following:

1. Metaverse (+/-)

What we predicted:

The Metaverse “will revive a lot of legal questions that were first discussed when virtual worlds were a hot topic: Rights in virtual property, personality rights of avatars, interchange-ability of virtual objects, and who is responsible if they lose their value (for whatever reason).”


We also said that the Metaverse “will certainly generate more investments and big technology advancements.”

What happened:

The Metaverse certainly made headlines in 2022 but maybe not quite

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