Illegal migrants refuse to leave NYC hotel for Brooklyn migrant relief center, sleep in the street

A group of illegal migrants, who entered into the U.S. through the southern border, are refusing to leave their free NYC hotel rooms for a migrant shelter in Brooklyn, New York, sleeping in the street to protest.

The migrants were initially placed at the Watson Hotel in Midtown Manhattan, but their schedule for relocation to a new migrant relief center, the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, caused uproar late Sunday night.

While some migrants left for the new shelter, many refused to vacate the Hell’s Kitchen hotel and rallied outside the building alongside migrant activists. The migrants who were noncompliant in the city’s relocation spent the night outside the hotel and were seen

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Martha’s Vineyard migrant flight lawsuit could cost Florida $1 million

TALLAHASSEE — Florida has agreed to pay up to $1 million to two law firms to defend it following Gov. Ron DeSantis’ controversial decision last summer to relocate nearly 50 Venezuelan migrants from Texas to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. 

So far, the state has paid nearly $112,000 to the firms Consovoy McCarthy and Campbell Conroy & O’Neil to represent DeSantis and other state officials in a class action lawsuit filed in Boston by attorneys representing the migrants. 

This is on top of the nearly $1.6 million paid to Destin, Fla.-based aviation firm Vertol Systems Company, which the state contracted for the migrant flights.

Post-flights overview:Revisiting DeSantis, Martha’s Vineyard, and the migrant flight controversy

Administration’s role on flights:Text messages reveal DeSantis officials worked closely for weeks on Venezuelan migrant flights

When combined, it represents a cost of around $35,000 for each migrant relocated through the program.

The legal contracts were

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Cuban migrant arrivals overwhelm immigration officials

So many people from Cuba are arriving in the Florida Keys that days could go by before federal officials are able to pick up migrants on the side of U.S. 1 to be processed, according to local law enforcement.

Since Friday, more than 500 Cubans arrived in the island chain. So many landed in a group of sparsely inhabited islands off Key West that the federal government was forced to close the Dry Tortugas National Park on Sunday.

The situation is frustrating local officials. Monroe County Sheriff Rick Ramsay issued a statement Monday calling the scenes playing out on the sides of the Keys’ only major highway a “federal failure” that is “creating a humanitarian crisis.”

“This shows a lack of a working plan by the federal government to deal with a mass migration issue that was foreseeable,” Ramsay said.

The Border Patrol did not immediately respond to requests for

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Migrant crossings plummet as Texas National Guard expands barbwire fence along the border

Shipping containers placed on U.S. side of Rio Grande in El Paso

EL PASO, Texas (Border Report) – Migrant crossings have plummeted in a mile-long stretch of Downtown El Paso where the Texas Army National Guard has set up concertina wire and portable fencing along the Rio Grande.

The guard began setting up the barrier last week at a gap in the border wall west of the Paso del Norte port of entry. In the space of eight days, the barbed wire has nearly reached a second port of entry and chain-link fence anchored by sandbags extends even farther. The result is that asylum seekers can no longer walk across ankle-deep water in the Rio Grande and turn themselves in to waiting Border Patrol agents in that area.

“The difference is vast,” said 1st Sgt. Suzanne Ringle. “The 19th, the 20th and the 21st we

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California’s border and the Title 42 migrant scramble

In summary

The Supreme Court is keeping in place, for now, Title 42 — the pandemic policy that OK’d migrant expulsions. California has yet to figure out how to meet the needs of an influx of migrants when it does go away, especially given that the state is confronting a projected budget deficit of $24 billion for the next fiscal year.

The Supreme Court’s latest move allows a short-term reprieve to an anticipated increase in asylum seekers trying to cross from Mexico into California and other states, but recent confusion at the border is a preview of what may soon come should a pandemic-era measure known as Title 42 be lifted in 2023. 

The situation, and its use as a political backdrop, has prompted local officials to ask what state resources will be available next year with California facing a potential budget shortfall and the possibility that Title 42 will

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