Traffic stop leads to drug arrests | Criminal Law







handcuffs, police

MCCRACKEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY (WSIL) — The Sheriff announces a traffic stop that led to a drug bust.

A deputy conducted a traffic stop in the early morning hours of January 16th. The officer pulled over a Honda on Brown Street near Broad Street.

The car was being driven by 37-year-old Ronald Hoyle of Paducah.  Meanwhile, 45-year-old Elizabeth Thomason of Paducah was a passenger.

During the investigation, it was discovered that both Hoyle and Thomason were in possession of Methamphetamine and other items related to drug paraphernalia.

Both were arrested and taken to the McCracken County Regional Jail where they were lodged.







Ronald Hoyle McCracken County

Hoyle faces several traffic and drug charges, which include:

  • Failure to or Improper Signal
  • Failure to Produce Insurance Card
  • Possession of Controlled Substance 1st Degree 1st Offense (Methamphetamine)
  • Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possess






Elizabeth Thomason McCracken County

Thomason also faces the following charges:

  • Possession of Controlled Substance 1st Degree 1st Offense
Read More

How environmental law is misused to stop housing

In summary

Two recent appellate court cases underscore the chaotic role that the California Environmental Quality Act plays in construction of much-needed housing.



It’s well known that the California Environmental Quality Act, signed by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in 1970 and meant to protect the natural environment in public and private projects, is routinely misused to stop or delay much-needed housing construction.

Anti-housing NIMBYs in affluent communities misuse it to stymie high-density, multi-family projects, arguing that their neighborhoods’ bucolic ambience would be altered. And construction unions misuse it to extract wage concessions from developers.

It’s a long-running civic scandal and a major factor in California’s chronic inability to reduce its severe housing shortage, one that cries out for CEQA reform, which former Gov. Jerry Brown once described as “the Lord’s work.” But neither Brown or any other recent governor has

Read More